Swipe

sirenrecordsmonterey

The acclaimed pianist and composer Francesco Tristano, returns to his first love -early music for his new studio album 'On Early Music'. The album presents Renaissance and early-Baroque works with five of his own Baroque-inspired piano pieces. Interspersed with these are works by some of early music's greatest English composers and organists -Orlando Gibbons, John Bull, and Peter Philips-and one of Tristano's greatest inspirations, Italian composer Girolamo Frescobaldi. Yet On Early Music is not merely a fitting homage to this repertoire; the works are given a fresh, contemporary twist thanks to Tristano's production skills, studio mastery, and keen eye for detail. All the works featured are tonally and melodically complimentary, and while some have been faithfully reproduced, others have been re-worked and reinterpreted. "I wanted to bring something new to them," he says. "Something original." That led him to works that reflected another of the album's main themes, and something he wanted to focus on and bring to the fore -the gentle majesty of sunrise. "Early music has a reparative power, just like an early sunrise," he says, "and these works give me an uplifting feeling. There's something really primitive about them, but something rejuvenating too." For Tristano, this repertoire remains as joyful and inspiring as when it was composed over 500 years ago, and is thoroughly deserving of a contemporary audience.
The acclaimed pianist and composer Francesco Tristano, returns to his first love -early music for his new studio album 'On Early Music'. The album presents Renaissance and early-Baroque works with five of his own Baroque-inspired piano pieces. Interspersed with these are works by some of early music's greatest English composers and organists -Orlando Gibbons, John Bull, and Peter Philips-and one of Tristano's greatest inspirations, Italian composer Girolamo Frescobaldi. Yet On Early Music is not merely a fitting homage to this repertoire; the works are given a fresh, contemporary twist thanks to Tristano's production skills, studio mastery, and keen eye for detail. All the works featured are tonally and melodically complimentary, and while some have been faithfully reproduced, others have been re-worked and reinterpreted. "I wanted to bring something new to them," he says. "Something original." That led him to works that reflected another of the album's main themes, and something he wanted to focus on and bring to the fore -the gentle majesty of sunrise. "Early music has a reparative power, just like an early sunrise," he says, "and these works give me an uplifting feeling. There's something really primitive about them, but something rejuvenating too." For Tristano, this repertoire remains as joyful and inspiring as when it was composed over 500 years ago, and is thoroughly deserving of a contemporary audience.
194399173923

More Info:

The acclaimed pianist and composer Francesco Tristano, returns to his first love -early music for his new studio album 'On Early Music'. The album presents Renaissance and early-Baroque works with five of his own Baroque-inspired piano pieces. Interspersed with these are works by some of early music's greatest English composers and organists -Orlando Gibbons, John Bull, and Peter Philips-and one of Tristano's greatest inspirations, Italian composer Girolamo Frescobaldi. Yet On Early Music is not merely a fitting homage to this repertoire; the works are given a fresh, contemporary twist thanks to Tristano's production skills, studio mastery, and keen eye for detail. All the works featured are tonally and melodically complimentary, and while some have been faithfully reproduced, others have been re-worked and reinterpreted. "I wanted to bring something new to them," he says. "Something original." That led him to works that reflected another of the album's main themes, and something he wanted to focus on and bring to the fore -the gentle majesty of sunrise. "Early music has a reparative power, just like an early sunrise," he says, "and these works give me an uplifting feeling. There's something really primitive about them, but something rejuvenating too." For Tristano, this repertoire remains as joyful and inspiring as when it was composed over 500 years ago, and is thoroughly deserving of a contemporary audience.
back to top